Cutting Red Tape

Regulator information

A large number of organisations play a part in securing compliance with the law. They include national regulators, local authorities, and bodies independent of Government, some of which have statutory regulatory functions. This is a list of the main national regulators. It is not exhaustive. We expect to continue to add information to it.

Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA)
Animals in Science Regulation Unit
Architects Registration Board (ARB)
British Hallmarking Council (BHC)
Care Quality Commission (CQC)
Charity Commission for England and Wales
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)
Claims Management Regulation Unit
Coal Authority
Companies House
Competition Commission
Professional Standards for Health and Social Care (PSA)
Disclosure and Barring Service(DBS)
Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI)
Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)
Driving Standards Agency (DSA)
Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate (EAS)
English Heritage (EH)
Environment Agency
Equality and Human Rights Commission
Financial Reporting Council (FRC)
Fish Health Inspectorate (FHI), Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)
Food and environment research agency (plant and bee health) and (Plant Variety and Seeds)
Food Standards Agency (FSA)
Forestry Commission
Gambling Commission
Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA)
Health and Safety Executive (HSE)
Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)
Highways Agency (HA)
HM Revenue and Customs (Money Laundering Regulations and National Minimum Wage)
Homes & Communities Agency (HCA)
Human Fertilisation and Embryology Association (HFEA)
Human Tissue Authority (HTA)
Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)
Insolvency Service including Insolvency Practitioner Unit
Intellectual Property Office (IPO)
Legal Services Board (LSB)
Marine Management Organisaton (MMO)
Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA)
Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)
Monitor
National Measurement Office (NMO)
Natural England
Office of Communications
Office for Fair Access (OFFA)
Office for Nuclear Regulation(ONR)
Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (OFSTED)
Office of Fair Trading
OFQUAL
Office of Rail Regulation (ORR)
Office of the Regulator of Community Interest Companies
OFGEM
Pensions Regulator
Rural Payments Agency (RPA)
Security Industry Authority (SIA)
Senior Traffic Commissioner
Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA)
Trinity House Lighthouse Service (THLS)
UK Anti-Doping (UKAD)
Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA)
Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA)
Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD)
Water Services Regulation Authority (OFWAT)

 

Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA)

A new Agency was formed on 1/10/14, combining the former Animal Health and Veterinery Laboratories (AHVLA) with the Plant and Bee Health Inspectorate Units of the Food and Environment Reaearch Agency (FERA). This became the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). The joint mission is to work together to safeguard animal and plant health for the benefit of people, the environment and the economy. However, the date of this return is prior to that change and will only reflect the information of the former AHVLA regulatory activity.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Animals in Science Regulation Unit

The Animals in Science Regulation Unit implements the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The 1986 Act regulates the use of animals in scientific procedures. The Unit licenses individuals to carry out procedures on animals and the projects (programmes of work) in which those procedures are applied. It also designates the places at which animals are used and bred from which animals are used and bred and from which animals are supplied for use in regulated procedures. Compliance with legislation and licences is monitored by the Unit’s inspectorate.

View the organogram [Links to discuss.bis.gov.uk website]

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Architects Registration Board (ARB)

The Architects Registration Board (ARB) is the statutory regulator for architects. It maintains a public Register, prescribes the qualifications needed to become an architect, sets standards for conduct and competence, regulates the use of the title “architect” and assists mobility of architects as the competent authority.

View the organogram [Links to arb.org.uk website]

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British Hallmarking Council (BHC)

The remit of the British Hallmarking Council (BHC) is set out in the Hallmarking Act 1973 s13. This imposes a duty on the BHC to ensure that adequate facilities for the assaying and hallmarking of articles of precious metal are available as from time to time required in the United Kingdom; to supervise the activities of assay offices; to take all steps appearing to be open to them for ensuring the enforcement of the law with respect to hallmarking; and to advise the Secretary of State with respect to all matters concerning the due execution of the Hallmarking Act, including any matter which may be referred to the BHC by the Secretary of State. The BHC has no staff but does have the services of a Chairman and Secretary, the latter being the accounting officer. Their costs and any other expenses or costs are recovered from the Assay Offices by means of an agreed formula. There is no cost to the Exchequer or taxpayers.

Council Members

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Care Quality Commission (CQC)

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care. It registers providers of regulated activities (including NHS, adult social care, dentists, independent sector healthcare providers, and from April 2013 General Practice) and monitors whether the care provided continues to meet essential standards of quality and safety. CQC also protects the interests and monitors the rights of vulnerable people, including those who are detained under the Mental Health Act or who are subject to Deprivations of Liberty. CQC has enforcement powers that it uses to ensure service providers meet requirements or, where appropriate, to suspend, cancel or impose conditions on registrations. CQC also undertakes investigations and thematic inspections of particular services, looking across providers of health and adult social care.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Charity Commission for England and Wales

The Charity Commission for England and Wales registers and regulates charities in England and Wales. Its core role is to protect the public’s interest in the integrity of charity: to ensure that charities focus on the purposes which give them charitable status and that they carry them out for the public benefit serving neither private nor governmental or political interests. The Commission registers around 5,500 charities per year; produces generic guidance; provides statutory advice and permissions (213,022 emails, letters and phone calls dealt with in 2011/12); promotes transparency through charity annual returns (97% of registered charities’ income covered by accounts and returns made publically available); and investigates alleged wrongdoing (85 investigations closed in 2011/12). The Commission maintains the online Register of Charities, which provides information about each of approximately 160,000 main registered charities (and also around 20,000 subsidiary charities).

View the organogram [Links to GOV.UK website]

Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)

The Civil Aviation Authority’s (CAA) regulatory remit covers economic, safety, airspace and consumer protection issues. The CAA has four main responsibilities: it ensures that UK civil aviation safety standards are set and achieved; regulates the economic activities of airports and the en-route air traffic services provider and encourages a diverse and competitive industry; manages the UK’s principal travel protection scheme, the Air Travel Organisers’ Licensing (ATOL) scheme, licenses UK airlines and manages consumer issues; and brings civil and military interests together to ensure that the airspace needs of all users are met as equitably as possible.

View the organogram [Links to www.caa.co.uk website]

Claims Management Regulation Unit

The Claims Management Regulation Unit (CMRU) of the Ministry of Justice has been responsible for directly regulating the activities of businesses providing claims management services since April 2007 under Part 2 of the Compensation Act 2006. The 2006 Act defines claims management services as “advice or other services in relation to the making of a claim”. The claims sectors subject to regulation are: Personal Injury; Financial Products/Services; Employment; Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit; Criminal Injuries Compensation and Housing Disrepair.

Contact details [Links to GOV.UK website]

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Coal Authority

The Coal Authority’s specific statutory responsibilities are associated with: licensing coal mining operations in Britain (the regulatory role); handling subsidence damage claims which are not the responsibility of licensed coalmine operators; managing property and historic liability issues, such as surface hazards and treatment of minewater discharges; and providing public access to information on past and present coal mining operations. The Energy Bill 2011 enabled the expertise of the Coal Authority to be used in non-coal mining related contexts.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Companies House

Companies House has responsibility for: incorporating and dissolving limited companies; examining and storing company information delivered under the Companies Act and related legislation; and making this information available to the public.

View the organogram

Competition Commission

The Competition Commission (CC) is an independent public body which conducts in-depth inquiries into mergers, markets and the regulation of major regulated industries. The CC is not strictly a ‘regulator’. CC cannot initiate our own inquiries and we do not deal with any particular industry. Rather it conducts inquiries into cases referred to us by others (most often the OFT). CC is charged with investigating and deciding substantial economic questions regarding competition in markets. It has a separate role as appeal body for regulatory matters from a number of the sectoral regulators. CC’s competition decisions are subject to judicial review by the Competition Appeal Tribunal (CAT); its regulatory decisions are subject to judicial review in the High Court.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care

The Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA) oversees the statutory bodies that regulate health and social care professionals in the UK. The PSA assesses their performance, conducts audits, scrutinises their decisions and reports to Parliament. It also sets standards for organisations holding voluntary registers for health and social care occupations and accredits those that meet them.

The PSA shares good practice and knowledge, conduct research and introduces new ideas to our sector including our concept of right-touch regulation. It monitors policy developments in the UK and internationally and provides advice on issues relating to professional standards in health and social care. PSA does this to promote the health, safety and well-being of users of health and social care services and the public.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) helps employers make safer recruitment decisions, and prevents unsuitable people from working with vulnerable groups, including children. It replaces the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA).

The Disclosure and barring service is responsible for processing requests for criminal records checks; deciding whether it is appropriate for a person to be placed on or removed from a barred list; placing or removing people from the DBS children’s barred list and adults’ barred list for England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI)

The Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI) is the independent regulator of drinking water. Its main aim is to help protect public health and maintain public confidence in drinking water through independent, effective and proportionate regulation of the quality of public and private drinking water supplies and by providing independent technical advice to ministers in England and Wales on all aspects of drinking water quality. DWI’s parent department is Defra.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)’s main responsibilities are to: maintain over 44 million driver records and 36 million vehicle records; collect nearly £6 billion a year in vehicle excise duty; and support the police and intelligence authorities in dealing with vehicle related crime.

DVLA’s purpose is to keep registers of drivers and vehicles and make them as accessible and as flexible as possible to those who have the right to use them. These registers underpin action by DVLA, the police and others to keep road users safe and ensure that the law is respected and observed. The registeres also allow us to collect vehicle excise duty effectively and can be used to deliver other departmental and government initiatives.

As a supplement to core operations for all motorists, the DVLA provides specific services to some business customers to help to reduce business costs. Access to services is monitored, but does not require significant formal enforcement activity.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Driving Standards Agency (DSA)

The mission of the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) is Safe Driving for Life. DSA sets standards for pre-driver education, driver trainers, supervising trainers, and carries out theory and practical driving and riding tests. DSA also has statutory responsibility for approval and quality assurance of Approved Driving Instructors and for Driver Certificates of Professional Competence Periodic Training centres and courses on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport (SoS), statutory responsibility for approval of Drink Drive Rehabilitation Scheme (DDRS) courses on behalf of the SoS and operational oversight of national DDRS availability and delivery for the Department of Transport. In conjunction with the police DSA investigates and prosecutes offences of illegal driving instruction and driving test impersonations. DSA’s foremost activity is to assess driving competence through theory and practical driving tests.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate (EAS)

The mission of the Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate (EAS) is to work with agencies, employers and workers to ensure compliance with employment rights, particularly for vulnerable workers. The main role of EAS is to ensure compliance with the employment agency legislation, and the associated Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations, across Great Britain. EAS has powers to tackle employment agencies by seeking compliance with the employment agency legislation. Where necessary EAS will issue agencies with warnings and seek to ensure that corrective measures are put in place. In extreme cases, EAS can consider prosecution or prohibiting individuals from running an employment agency for up to 10 years.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

English Heritage (EH)

English Heritage (EH) has a general power to prosecute any offence under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the Listed Buildings Act 1990. EH also has the power to apply for an injunction in order to prevent any of the offences taking place. EH has a general power to enter any land, other than a building occupied as a dwelling, for the purpose of inspection to compile records. It also has powers of entry in relation to scheduled monuments. EH has additional powers in Greater London, those of a local planning authority, for the purposes of serving Listed Building Enforcement Notices, Urgent Works Notices in respect of compulsory acquisition of listed buildings in need of repair, and may enter land in connection with these powers.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Environment Agency

The Environment Agency (EA) is responsible for delivering the following high level outcomes: act to reduce climate change and its consequences; work with businesses and other organisations to use resources wisely; and protect and improve water, land and air quality. The responsibilities of the Environment Agency include; air quality; emissions to air, discharges to water and waste produced from regulated sites; resource use, including water and energy; environmental permits; waste management facilities; water and land quality; managing water resources; fisheries and navigation; and leading on climate change adaptation. This information relates to the Environment Agency’s regulatory activities in England and Wales. The regulatory budget includes full staff costs (not just salary) and support such as IT associated with delivering its regulatory services. The Environment Agency’s figures exclude its non-regulatory activities such as Flood Defence. The Environment Agency’s parent department is Defra.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Equality and Human Rights Commission

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has a statutory remit to promote and monitor human rights, and to protect, enforce and promote equality across the nine “protected” grounds – age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, pregnancy and maternity, marriage and civil partnership, sexual orientation and gender reassignment.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Financial Reporting Council (FRC)

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) promotes high quality corporate governance and reporting to foster investment. It sets the Corporate Governance and Stewardship Codes; monitors their impact. It sets UK standards for accounting, auditing and actuarial work; influences international standards. FRC reviews the quality of public companies’ accounts; secures any necessary revisions. It reviews quality of audit of major public interest entities. It oversees the regulatory activities of the accountancy and actuarial professional bodies, and provides the independent disciplinary arrangements for public interest cases involving accountants and actuaries.

FRM Reform Details

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Fish Health Inspectorate (FHI), Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)

The Fish Health Inspectorate (FHI), located in the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, is the official service for the control of serious diseases of aquatic animals in England and Wales, responsible for the implementation of the EU aquatic animal health regime on behalf of Defra and the Welsh Government (WG). Responsibilities include the statutory inspection of aquaculture production businesses, investigation and control of disease outbreaks in wild and farmed aquatic animals, and the implementation of controls on trade in live fish, shellfish and crustaceans. The FHI provides additional services to Defra and WG, and to other government bodies where these can be integrated into inspection programmes. This includes sampling for veterinary residues, assessing water pollution impacts, the provision of production statistics, assessing welfare status on farms, and the control of non-native species.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Food and environment research agency (plant and bee health) and (Plant Variety and Seeds)

The Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) is responsible for the delivery of regulatory services in respect of varieties and seeds including Intellectual Property Rights and Consumer Protection legislation relating to plant varieties and seeds. FERA is also responsible for the delivery of regulatory services in respect of plant and bee health on behalf of Defra with the primary purpose of preventing the introduction and spread of harmful pest and disease.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Food Standards Agency (FSA)

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) is the Central Competent Authority (CCA) for food safety and feed safety in the UK. FSA directly delivers enforcement in FSA approved meat and dairy premises. FSA also enforces wine standards and animal welfare at slaughterhouses on behalf of Defra who are the CCA for those pieces of legislation. Local Authorities (LAs) deliver enforcement on behalf of FSA in the majority of other food establishments. Third party enforcers also act on FSA’s behalf for egg hygiene.

Budget for regulatory activity (2011/12): £70,341,536. (This figure does not include the cost of third party regulatory enforcement.)

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Forestry Commission

The Forestry Commission is responsible for the protection, improvement and expansion of woodlands through empowerment and promoting economic activity. The Forestry Commission’s regulatory functions include felling controls and protection of the woodland resource from plant health issues, pests and diseases. Wider work of the Forestry Commission includes the administration of £30m per year of funds to support woodland management and creation activity (as part of the Rural Development Plan for England). This work is heavily integrated with the Forestry Commission’s regulatory functions. In addition, another arm of the Forestry Commission manages the 250,000ha Public Forest Estate. Thus in pursuing its remit the Forestry Commission uses a wide range of levers of which regulation is just one, others being direct intervention, Grant Aid, advice and partnership working, research. The Forestry Commission’s parent department is Defra.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Gambling Commission

The Gambling Commission regulates commercial gambling (all gambling except National Lottery and spread betting) in Great Britain, working closely with partners, licensing authorities and other organisations such as the police and HM Revenue and Customs. The Gambling Commission regulates casinos, bingo, gaming machines and lotteries as well as betting, arcades and remote gambling. The Gambling Commission has a remit to permit gambling as long as it is consistent with the three statutory licensing objectives: to keep crime out of gambling; to ensure gambling is conducted fairly and openly; and to protect children and vulnerable people from being harmed or exploited by gambling.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA)

The Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA) was established in April 2005, implementing the provisions of the Gangmasters (Licensing) Act 2004 which created it as a statutory body. The mission of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority is to safeguard the welfare and interests of workers whilst ensuring Labour Providers operate within the law. It achieves this by regulating those who provide labour under contract to labour users, particularly in the food gathering and packaging industries by: introducing and operating a system to license Labour Providers, including a publicly accessible register; developing and promoting standards for best practice in the supply and use of temporary labour, in collaboration with stakeholders; checking licence holders for continued compliance with the licence conditions; taking enforcement action against those who operate illegally or who for other reasons are judged unfit to hold a licence; and supporting enforcement of the law, by or in conjunction with the Enforcement Authorities of other Government Departments, and others as appropriate, through shared information and joint working. GLA’s parent department is Defra.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Health and Safety Executive (HSE)

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) regulates work-related health and safety in Great Britain in partnership with local authorities in accordance with the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. Its mission is the prevention of death, injury and ill health to those at work and those affected by work activities. It delivers it within a new framework for health and safety set by the Government in ‘Good Health and Safety, Good for Everyone’. It regulates health and safety accross a range of sectors/industries including major hazard sites such as nuclear installations, offshore gas and oil installations and onshore chemical plants through to the more conventional such as construction sites, farms, manufacturing, waste management and recycling sites. Its strategy document, ‘The health and safety of Great Britain: Be part of the solution’ defines the goals that the HSE, local authority health and safety regulators and all stakeholders in the health and safety system should achieve.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)

HEFCE’s remit includes; funding universities and colleges (including further education colleges) for higher education teaching, research, knowledge exchange, and related activities; monitoring the financial and managerial health of universities and colleges to ensure that the funds it distributes are properly accounted for and provide value for money; ensuring that the quality of teaching in higher education is assessed; supporting the development of higher education by funding specific initiatives and providing best practice guidance; helping Government to manage the level of entrants to higher education; providing the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with information and advice on higher education, and in particular on the overall performance and sustainability of the HE sector and on applications for designation for university title, eligibility for student support, and eligibility for direct funding; promoting and working to protect the interests of students (including past and prospective students) in higher education in England.

The Highways Agency (HA)

The Highways Agency is an executive agency of the Department for Transport and is responsible for operating, maintaining and improving the strategic road network which incorporates the majority of England’s motorways and A roads.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

HM Revenue & Customs (Money Laundering Regulations & National Minimum Wage)

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has a legal responsibility under the Money Laundering Regulations 2007 to maintain a register of and carry out supervisory activities for six business sectors. The legislation also gives HMRC powers to impose unlimited penalties and/or prosecute businesses that it supervises for failing to comply with their obligations under the anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing legislation.

Policy webpage

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is contracted under a Service Level Agreement (SLA) to enforce the National Minimum Wage (NMW) on behalf of the Department for Business, which owns the policy. The SLA is renewed every year. The 2011 SLA sets out HMRC’s responsibilities under the agreement and also HMRC’s jurisdiction.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Homes & Communities Agency (HCA)

The Homes & Communities Agency (HCA) is the independent regulator of social housing providers in England.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Human Fertilisation and Embryology Association (HFEA)

The HFEA is the UK’s independent regulator of treatment using eggs and sperm, and of treatment and research involving human embryos. It sets standards for, and issues licences to, centres.

The HFEA’s current statutory functions as a regulator under the HFE Acts 1990 and 2008 and other legislation are to; license and monitor clinics carrying out in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and donor insemination; license and monitor establishments undertaking human embryo research; maintain a register of licences held by clinics, research establishments and storage centres; regulate storage of gametes (eggs and sperm) and embryos ; implement the requirements of the European Union Tissue and Cells Directive (EUTCD) to relicense IVF clinics and to license Intrauterine Insemination (IUI), Gamete Intrafallopian Transfer (GIFT) and other services.

Human Tissue Authority (HTA)

The Human Tissue Authority is responsible for licensing organisations that store and use human tissue for purposes such as research, patient treatment, post-mortem examination, teaching, and public exhibitions. The HTA also gives approval for organ and bone marrow donations from living people.

Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is the UK’s independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest, promoting openness by public bodies and data privacy for individuals. The ICO regulates both the Data Protection Act and the Freedom of Information Act. The information published here relates to the office’s work in respect of the Data Protection Act and associated legislation only, as it is this legislation which affects the private sector (as well as the public sector).The Freedom of Information Act only applies to public authorities.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Insolvency Service including Insolvency Service – Insolvency Practitioner Unit

The system of regulation of insolvency practitioners in Great Britain is one of government monitored self regulation. The Insolvency Service (IS) carries out the dual functions of the Secretary of State: 1) Monitoring the regulatory activities of the eight regulators. There are seven Recognised Professional Bodies (RPBs), mainly accountancy bodies, who are recognised by the Secretary of State as being competent to ensure that their members are fit and proper persons to act as insolvency practitioners. 2) The Secretary of State is also a Competent Authority as defined by Section 392(2) of the Insolvency Act 1986 and currently authorises 66 individuals to act as insolvency practitioners.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Intellectual Property Office (IPO)

The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) grants intellectual property rights. It provides policy advice to government. It administers regulation, in terms of introducing legal reform, but the purpose of this is to enable activity, not to regulate behaviour. The rights administered by the IPO are optional private rights in the sense that businesses choose whether they wish to apply for them. Once a right is granted, enforcement of it is generally a matter for the right owner. Where a third party is alleged to have infringed a right the owner can take civil action through the courts or use the IPO tribunal service. The IPO sets the framework that provides the economic incentives (in the form of monopoly rights) that may encourage businesses to be more creative or innovative.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Legal Services Board (LSB)

Legal Services Board (LSB) oversees the regulation of legal services in England and Wales. It does this through its oversight of ten bodies, the approved regulators, who themselves regulate directly the circa 120,000 lawyers practising throughout the jurisdiction. The approved regulators are: The Law Society; Solicitors Regulation Authority; Bar Council; Bar Standards Board; Council for Licensed Conveyancers; Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys; Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys; Intellectual Property Regulation Board; Chartered Institute of Legal Executives; ILEX Professional Standards Limited; Association of Costs Lawyers; Costs Lawyer Standards Board; and Master of the Faculties. The LSB does not regulate any legal service provider directly. Working with the approved regulators, the LSB is responsible for ensuring the highest standards of competence, conduct and service in the legal profession both for the benefit of individual consumers and the public generally. The LSB is also responsible for appointing the Office for Legal Complaints, to administer an ombudsman scheme to deal with consumers’ complaints about legal services.

Organagram

Marine Management Organisaton (MMO)

The objective of the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) is to make a contribution to the achievement of sustainable development in the UK marine area. It is the marine planning and licensing authority for English waters, manages the UK fishing fleet capacity and quotas and has responsibilities for managing marine protected areas. MMO’s sponsor department is Defra.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA)

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) checks the safety standards of UK and foreign ships, provides seafarer certification services, manages the UK Ship Register, and develops and implements maritime safety regulations and standards. MCA also provides a 24 hour maritime emergency response capability through HM Coastguard, including search and rescue and counter pollution.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is responsible for the regulation of medicines and medical devices and equipment used in healthcare, and the investigation of harmful incidents. The MHRA also looks after blood and blood products, working with UK blood services, healthcare providers, and other relevant organisations to improve blood quality and safety.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Monitor

Monitor assesses NHS trusts for foundation trust status and licenses foundation trusts to ensure they are well-led, in terms of both quality and finances. Monitor’s licensing system is used to help set prices for NHS-funded care (in partnership with NHS England); enable integrated care; safeguard choice and prevent anti-competitive behaviour which is against the interests of patients; and support commissioners to protect essential health services for patients if a provider gets into financial difficulties.

They currently license foundation trusts. Other eligible providers of NHS health care services will require a licence from April 2014.

National Measurement Office (NMO)

Part of the National Measurement Office’s (NMO) mission is to promote competition and fair trading underpinned by the Weights and Measures (W&M), Electricity, Gas, and Hallmarking Acts, and associated European legislation. The NMO carries out statutory duties to ensure open, fair, and competitive trading when based upon measurement of weight, volume, length, electricity and gas. Such statutory duties include: appointment and monitoring of bodies verifying trade instruments; certifying local authority measurement standards; approving new designs of measuring instruments prescribed by UK law; designation & monitoring of Notified Bodies and undertaking market surveillance under 2 EU directives; and monitoring the enforcement of the W&M and hallmarking Acts by local authority trading standards. The NMO is also contracted as the enforcement authority for other BIS legislation (Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances and Batteries and Accumulators (placing on the market)) and for Defra legislation (Energy Related Products and Energy Labeling).

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Natural England

The statutory purpose of Natural England (NE) is to ensure the natural environment is conserved, enhanced and managed for the benefit of present and future generations, thereby contributing to sustainable development. This involves: nature conservation and protecting biodiversity; landscape conservation, including advising government on protected landscapes; facilities for the study, understanding and enjoyment of the natural environment; promoting access and encouraging outdoor recreation; and contributing to social and economic wellbeing through the management of the natural environment. Delegated functions include wildlife licensing and the delivery of agri-environment schemes. Natural England’s parent department is Defra.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

OFCOM

The Office of Communications’ (Ofcom) primary duty is to further the interests of citizens and consumers in communications matters. Its main legal duties are to ensure: the UK has a wide range of electronic communications services, including high-speed services such as broadband; a wide range of high-quality television and radio programmes are provided, appealing to a range of tastes and interests; television and radio services are provided by a range of different organisations; people who watch television and listen to the radio are protected from harmful or offensive material; people are protected from being treated unfairly in television and radio programmes, and from having their privacy invaded; a universal postal service is provided in the UK (this means a six days a week, universally priced delivery and collection service across the country); and radio spectrum (the airwaves used by everyone from taxi firms and boat owners, to mobile-phone companies and broadcasters) is used in the most effective way.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

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Office for Fair Access (OFFA)

The Office for Fair Access (OFFA) is a non-departmental public body whose role is to promote and safeguard fair access to higher education for lower income and other under-represented groups. Its principal duty is to approve, monitor and maintain access agreements with publicly-funded institutions (universities and colleges). OFFA also has a role in challenging institutional performance and supporting successful outcomes including identifying and disseminating good practice and advice connected with access agreements and institutional financial support.

View the organogram [Links to data.gov.uk website]

Office for Nuclear Regulation(ONR)

ONR has responsibility for regulating safety and security at 40 various nuclear licensed sites in the UK.

ONR assess licensees’ safety cases before granting permission for key activities. They check that licensees comply with their license conditions through planned inspections, on a sample basis according to information derived from safety cases and other operational intelligence. ONR undertakes the full spectrum of enforcement activities, from the provision of advice through to prosecution

Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted)

The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects childcare and children’s social care and inspects schools, colleges, initial teacher education, work-based learning and skills training, adult and community learning, education and training in prisons and other secure establishments, and the Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service. Ofsted assesses children’s services in local areas, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection. The only staff employed directly by Ofsted for dedicated regulatory activities are in social care. Much of Ofsted’s regulatory work in early years is delivered indirectly by an external contractor.

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Office of Fair Trading (OFT)

The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) is the UK’s primary competition and consumer agency. Its mission is to make markets work well for consumers. Its work enables competitive markets to deliver the incentives for greater business efficiency, and to ensure that firms are responsive to consumer demands. Its goal is competitive, efficient, innovative markets where standards of customer care are high, consumers are empowered and confident about making choices and where businesses comply with consumer and competition laws but are not overburdened by regulation.

 

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The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (OFQUAL)

The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual) is responsible for the regulation of qualifications (such as GCSEs and NVQs) and statutory assessments (such as National Curriculum Tests) in England, and for vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland; it does not regulate degrees. Its objectives are set out in section 128 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009, amended by the Education Act 2011. They include objectives to secure the standards of qualifications and assessments and bring them into line with those taken overseas, to promote public confidence in them, and to secure the efficiency of qualifications.

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Office of Rail Regulation (ORR)

The Office of Rail Regulation (ORR) is the independent safety and economic regulator for Great Britain’s railways. As national safety authority it regulates health and safety for the entire mainline network in Great Britain as well as London Underground, light rail, trams and the heritage sector. As economic regulator of the mainline railway it sets Network Rail’s outputs and funding based on the efficient cost of what the Government wants to buy from the railways and how much they have available. It then ensures those outputs are delivered. It also oversees access to the railway network and other essential facilities. As a competition and consumer authority it uses its powers to ensure that users and funders of railway markets and that passengers are treated fairly.

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Office of the Regulator of Community Interest Companies

The role of the Office of the Regulator of Community Interest Companies (RegCIC) is to approve applications for community interest companies and to ensure they deliver continued benefit to the community through light touch regulation. A community interest company is an ordinary company which has been set up to deliver benefits to the community and uses its assets (which includes profits and surpluses) to promote those aims.

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Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (OFGEM)

The Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem) regulates the gas and electricity markets in Britain. It protects the interests of existing and future consumers of gas and electricity conveyed via networks, which includes their interests in maintaining supplies of gas and electricity and in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This involves promoting effective competition where appropriate, monitoring the markets to ensure they are working well for consumers, and ex ante regulating the network monopoly companies. It has also been given statutory responsibility for administering several environmental schemes on behalf of the Government (such as the Renewables Obligation, the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target, the Community Energy Saving Programme, the Feed in Tariff Scheme and the Warm Homes Discount). It administers these schemes through its E-Serve Division.

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Pensions Regulator

The Pensions Regulator (TPR) is the regulator of work-based pensions in the UK and Northern Ireland, with a range of functions directed by five statutory objectives. It is a non-departmental public body of the Department of Work and Pensions.

TPR is responsible for regulating occupational defined benefit and defined contribution schemes and certain aspects of work-based personal pensions. It is also tasked with maximising employer compliance with duties related to automatic enrolment into pensions. From 2015, it will have responsibility for regulating the governance and administration of public service pension schemes. In line with its statutory objectives TPR aims to ensure that people responsible for providing access to and managing work-based pension schemes fulfil their obligations.

As a risk-based regulator, one of its core tasks is the identification and prioritisation of risks to pension scheme members, to enable regulatory intervention which will have the greatest impact.

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Rural Payments Agency (RPA)

The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) makes support payments to farmers in England and to traders throughout the United Kingdom. The RPA manages a range of Common Agricultural Policy schemes, including the Single Payments Scheme, and internal and external market schemes. RPA’s parent department is Defra.

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Security Industry Authority (SIA)

The Security Industry Authority (SIA) has two main duties. One is the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities within the private security industry; the other is to manage the voluntary Approved Contractors Scheme (ACS). Individuals working in specific sectors of the private security industry across the United Kingdom are required to be licensed to work in those sectors. The main focus of regulation in the proposed new regime (subject to consultation) will be the licensing of businesses operating in designated sectors. The primary responsibility for the proper deployment of registered individuals will rest with the business, although the regulator will maintain a register of individuals licensed to undertake designated activities.

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Office of the Senior Traffic Commissioner

The Traffic Commissioners are appointed by the Secretary of State for Transport and have responsibility for: the licensing of the operators of Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) and of buses and coaches (Public Service Vehicles or PSVs); the registration of local bus services; granting vocational licences and taking action against drivers of HGVs and PSVs. The Traffic Commissioner for Scotland is also responsible for dealing with both appeals against decisions by Scottish local authorities on taxi fares and appeals against charging and removing improperly parked vehicles in Edinburgh and Glasgow.

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Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA)

The Sports Grounds Safety Authority’s (SGSA) regulatory remit is to keep under review how local authorities discharge their responsibilities under the provisions of the Safety of Sports Grounds Act 1975 at premier and football league grounds, Wembley and the Millennium Stadium and to issue licences to those 94 grounds to allow the admission of spectators to those parts of the ground which comply with the Government’s policy in respect of seated and standing accommodation. The SGSA makes match day visits to clubs as part of its role of overseeing how local authorities discharge their responsibilities at grounds where designated football matches are played.

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Trinity House Lighthouse Service

Trinity House Lighthouse Service (THLS) is foremost the General Lighthouse Authority for England, Wales, the Channel Islands and Gibraltar, responsible for the provision of marine aids to navigation (AtoN) (lighthouses, buoys, beacons etc). THLS is one arm of Trinity House, a private corporation established in 1514 which also undertakes commercial trading and charitable activities.

THLS acts as a regulator in relation to local lighthouse authorities (LLAs) (for example, a harbour authority) having a duty to inspect their AtoN and report the findings to the LLA. THLS is also empowered to give directions to LLAs to make changes to their AtoN as necessary. This exercise only considers THLS’s regulatory role in relation to LLAs and not their wider activities.

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UK Anti-Doping (UKAD)

The UK Anti-Doping organisation is responsible for the implementation and management of the UK’s anti-doping policy, ensuring that sports bodies in the UK comply with the World Anti-Doping Code which is set out by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

UKAD delivers testing programmes across more than 45 Olympic, Paralympic and professional sports. UKAD is the results management authority for the determination of anti-doping rule violations and work to inform and educate athletes about their role and responsibilities towards anti-doping.

Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA)

The Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) carries out testing, enforcement and education services in Great Britain to improve the roadworthiness standards of vehicles, ensuring the compliance of operators and drivers. Its remit includes: conducting statutory annual testing for commercial vehicles and certain private vehicles; conducting targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators to ensure compliance with road safety legislation; supervising the MOT scheme to ensure that garages authorised to carry out MOT tests are doing so to the correct standards; providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in carrying out their independent regulatory function; providing a range of educational and advisory activities, e.g. at the roadside and at operators’ premises to promote road safety; conducting post-collision investigations; and monitoring products on the market for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and supporting safety recalls.

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The Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA)

The aims of the Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA) are to ensure, so far as it is able through the operation of statutory national and international schemes, that new vehicles and vehicle parts are designed and manufactured in conformity with appropriate road safety and environmental protection standards. In addition the VCA will, with the agreement of Department for Transport Ministers, undertake enforcement, regulatory and other services for the Department and other customers.

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Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD)

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) is responsible for the development and delivery of veterinary medicines policy in the UK. This covers the assessment, issue and maintenance of marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines; carrying out controls on the manufacture and distribution of veterinary medicines in the UK; inspection of manufacturers, wholesale dealers and retailers of veterinary medicines, including veterinary practice premises; surveillance for residues of veterinary medicines and illegal substances; and enforcement of the legislation. The VMD carries out pharmacovigilance activities in the veterinary sector, implements European legislation related to veterinary medicines, manages a research and development programme for veterinary medicines and has policy responsibility for veterinary antimicrobial resistance, including a surveillance programme. The VMD’s parent department is Defra.

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The Water Services Regulation Authority (Ofwat)

The Water Services Regulation Authority (Ofwat) is the economic regulator of the water and sewerage sector in England and Wales. Ofwat’s duties are primarily laid out in the Water Industry Act 1991, as amended by the Water Act 2003. Its primary duties are to: protect the interests of consumers, wherever appropriate by promoting competition; ensure that the companies properly carry out their functions; and ensure that the companies can finance their functions. Its secondary duties include: promoting economy and efficiency; and contributing to the achievement of sustainable development. Ofwat’s parent department is Defra.

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